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Everyone We've Been

Cover of Everyone We've Been

Everyone We've Been

"Everyone We've Been is a dazzling love story with mystery and dizzying twists. Sarah Everett's puzzle of a debut will easily hook readers as they piece together this consuming tale of hope and heartbreak."
-Adam Silvera, New York Times bestselling author of More Happy Than Not
"Addictive, charming, and full of surprises, EVERYONE WE'VE BEEN is a gorgeously written novel about our mistakes and how we recover from them."
—Adi Alsaid, author of LET'S GET LOST and NEVER ALWAYS SOMETIMES
For fans of Jandy Nelson and Jenny Han comes a new novel that will be hard to forget.


Addison Sullivan has been in an accident. In its aftermath, she has memory lapses and starts talking to a boy who keeps disappearing. She's afraid she's going crazy, and the worried looks on her family's and friends' faces aren't helping.

Addie takes drastic measures to fill in the blanks and visits the Overton Clinic. But there she unwittingly discovers it is not her first visit. And when she presses, she finds out that she had certain memories erased.

Flooded with questions about the past, Addison confronts the choices she can't even remember and wonders if you can possibly know the person you're becoming if you don't know the person you've been.
From the Hardcover edition.
"Everyone We've Been is a dazzling love story with mystery and dizzying twists. Sarah Everett's puzzle of a debut will easily hook readers as they piece together this consuming tale of hope and heartbreak."
-Adam Silvera, New York Times bestselling author of More Happy Than Not
"Addictive, charming, and full of surprises, EVERYONE WE'VE BEEN is a gorgeously written novel about our mistakes and how we recover from them."
—Adi Alsaid, author of LET'S GET LOST and NEVER ALWAYS SOMETIMES
For fans of Jandy Nelson and Jenny Han comes a new novel that will be hard to forget.


Addison Sullivan has been in an accident. In its aftermath, she has memory lapses and starts talking to a boy who keeps disappearing. She's afraid she's going crazy, and the worried looks on her family's and friends' faces aren't helping.

Addie takes drastic measures to fill in the blanks and visits the Overton Clinic. But there she unwittingly discovers it is not her first visit. And when she presses, she finds out that she had certain memories erased.

Flooded with questions about the past, Addison confronts the choices she can't even remember and wonders if you can possibly know the person you're becoming if you don't know the person you've been.
From the Hardcover edition.
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Excerpts-
  • From the book

    1

    On the first turn, I think about my orchestra uniform: a knee-length black skirt, soft and silky between my fingers.

    On the second turn, a stack of sheet music, pieces I'm halfway through learning or planning to learn.

    On the third turn, I slam into the seat in front of me. The boy three rows ahead jerks forward, too, but it's a backpack he guards instead of a viola case.

    On the fourth turn, the world bursts with noise. Smattering applause of broken glass. A startled scream from a little girl. Yellow streetlight that is too bright and thick and long. The trees whirl around us; it's hard to tell whether they are gliding around on a sheet of ice or we are.

    Finally we stop spinning.

    There is no sound.

    2

    AN HOUR EARLIER

    An hour earlier

    About thirty miles outside of Caldwell, we pick up the last set of passengers. An elderly Asian couple and a teenage boy who looks about my age—seventeen. The couple sits in the second row closest to the doors, but the boy keeps walking through the aisle, rubbing his palms together and breathing on his hands to warm them.

    He scans the bus as he enters the aisle, surveying the seating options. There are five or six other passengers, a small enough number that we're not wrestling for armrests or invading each other's personal space, which is the single worst thing about public transportation, especially on Saturdays. I'm near the back of the bus, just in case we get a surge of people.

    The boy passes the drowsy-looking college student on the left whose jet-black hair flops down over his eyes. He stops a few rows from my seat, on the right side of the aisle.

    Behind me, a mother shushes one of her two elementary-school-age kids.

    I watch as the boy peels his backpack off his shoulders and places it on the seat closest to the window. The backpack is half unzipped, the short metal legs of a tripod sticking out. He glances up at me, catching my eye, just as I'm about to look away.

    "God, it's cold," he says, rubbing his palms over his shoulders.

    "I know, it's freezing," I say back disappointingly. Uninterestingly.

    I notice that he's completely underdressed for this cold. His hair is tucked under a black wool beanie, but he's wearing a thin cotton shirt pushed up at his elbows. No coat, no scarf. How has he not frozen to death?

    "Jackets help," I blurt out, past the acceptable response time. Then add in a slightly more normal voice, "Or so I've been told."

    The boy assesses me and breaks into a grin that takes up his whole face as he looks down at how he's dressed. "Hmm. I might have to try that one of these days." His smile makes a funny feeling slide through my stomach. He hesitates a moment, then sits with his back to me, three rows ahead.

    I pull out my phone to check the time and see three texts from my mom, asking how the trip is going and what time the bus arrives so she can pick me up from the station. I send her a quick response before sticking the phone back in my pocket.

    "What do you play?" the boy asks a few minutes later, turning his entire upper body around to face me. He nods at the case occupying a seat next to me. The bus to Caldwell this morning got me there four hours before the concert started, so I'd brought my viola in case I found somewhere to practice and kill time while I waited.

    "The viola," I say. Why do I always spend so much time hoping someone will talk to me, only...

About the Author-
  • Sarah Everett remembers growing up in enchanted forests, on desert islands and inside a magical wardrobe. She would only ever erase her memory of past karaoke performances and certain fashion choices. She was born in west Africa but currently resides in Alberta, Canada where she attends graduate school and writes YA novels. Visit her on Twitter at @heysaraheverett.
Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    August 15, 2016
    On the way home from a concert, high school senior Addie Sullivan meets a guy she connects with. Then their bus crashes, and there’s no sign of him; when he turns up again, only Addie can see him. By this point, readers—who have access to chapters labeled “before”—know that the mystery “Bus Boy” closely resembles Zach, the guy Addie dated 18 months earlier. What they don’t know is why she doesn’t recognize this similarity herself. It’s only when Addie seeks help that she realizes her memories of Zach were erased; even more disturbing, there are other important things she doesn’t remember. This could be the setup for a thriller, but the secrets here are familial, not criminal—debut author Everett is interested in the role memory plays in shaping who we are. Though the idea that the one place with memory-erasing technology is just outside Addie’s small hometown stretches believability, and Everett’s examinations of memory, history, and resilience can be heavy-handed, she has crafted a complex and thought-provoking story. Ages 12–up. Agent: Suzie Townsend, New Leaf Literary & Media.

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    Random House Children's Books
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  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

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